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Dartmouth-based New Scotland Clothing Co. selling Nova Scotia-made shirts

Kevin and Scott Saccary, co-owners of New Scotland Clothing Co., pose for a photo wearing their new Nova Scotia-made t-shirts at their Dartmouth store on Thursday.

JEFF HARPER / METRO

Kevin and Scott Saccary, co-owners of New Scotland Clothing Co., pose for a photo wearing their new Nova Scotia-made t-shirts at their Dartmouth store on Thursday.

 

Wouldn’t it be cool to buy a T-shirt from a Nova Scotian company that’s actually made in Nova Scotia?

That’s been the goal of brothers Kevin and Scott Saccary since they started New Scotland Clothing Co. in late 2014. And a of couple weeks ago, they started selling T-shirts bearing their New Scotland logo, that were made right here in New Scotland.

“To be able to have a New Scotland shirt that’s made in Nova Scotia is pretty cool, rather than a New Scotland shirt that’s made in China,” Scott said standing in the pair’s downtown Dartmouth location on Thursday.

As competitive curlers who’ve represented Nova Scotia nationally, the brothers’ plan, originally, was to make curling apparel. That is, until Kevin and Scott showed off their logo design to their friends who told them, “Hey, I’d wear that.”

They started selling imported T-shirts bearing that logo at the Alderney Landing Farmers' Market a few months later.

Now, the company has grown to six employees and three locations – one on Wentworth Street in Dartmouth, one on the Halifax waterfront, and one at the Halifax airport – all three of which were opened in the run of about a month.

“We went from a Rubbermaid container down at the market to three shops,” Scott said.

For almost a year, New Scotland shirts have been made in Canada in a factory in Quebec, but the brothers wanted to bring their production closer to home.

A few months ago, they started a partnership with Stanfield’s, the company known for its underwear that’s been making clothes in Truro since the 1800s. The company is now making T-shirts for New Scotland -- “cut, spun, dyed -- everything in Truro.”

They’re still selling through some old imported inventory, and looking for a way to make quality sweatshirts locally, but the goal is to have everything they sell made locally.

“We want to support the local economy as well as have a Canadian made product, and even better, Nova Scotian made product,” Kevin said.